Harvard RoboBees

Based on biology, Harvard RoboBees are micro-robots that aim to mimic the behavior of their insect counterparts. Through shared intelligence and decentralized control, RoboBees may engage in activities such as artificial pollination, surveillance, and exploration of hazardous environments with greater robustness than singly deployed robots.

Thanks to NSF funding and Harvard SEAS's REU program, I had the opportuniity to collaborate with post-doctoral mentors in programming micro robots; I contributed code to enable automated navigation via gyroscope readings. Additionally, I assisted my fellow REU colleagues with their Arduino-based projects and gained exposure to the academic research experience.
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Thanks to the generosity of the NSF and Harvard SEAS, I enjoyed an intellectually stimulating and rewarding experience of research in micro robotics.

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To start, I familiarized myself with a motive microcontroller and TinyOS programming, looking to port C++ code to TinyOS in order to leverage the TinyOS open source libraries.

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Using AVR32 Studio and JTAG in a Unix environment, I furthered the gyro functionality in Centeye's heliboard, researching how to calculate yaw, pitch, and roll angles from the IMU 3000 gyro.

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The custom heliboard fits onto toy helicopters, which allows us to test our code on larger proxies before attempting integration on the much smaller, and more expensive RoboBee model.

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As part of the research experience, I also had the opportunity to write a technical paper, participate in peer reviews, and professionally present my work in front of my colleagues.